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Rachael98
10-06-11, 03:46 PM
Wow! I never knew that. I love etymology. :)

Well, guess what people? I love etymology too! So I created a thread on it (that's the one you're reading now;)).
So, share all your interesting etymology facts here:)!
Also, in true Rachael98-OT Style, I'm adding a poll:p.

MiniLaura
10-06-11, 04:01 PM
My favorite unit of measure (now even used in Google Earth!):
the smoot
www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2011/10/05/141009438/whats-a-smoot#more (http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2011/10/05/141009438/whats-a-smoot#more)

I actually looked this up today for another person before this thread came up just to make sure that I knew the etymology:
Kinnearing!
http://www.yarnharlot.ca/blog/archives/2007/08/02/i_was_kinnearing.html
http://www.yarnharlot.ca/blog/archives/2008/10/03/it_is_too_a_real_word.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/23/weekinreview/23buzzwords.html?_r=1&oref=slogin&pagewanted=2

And a lovely song for you (but a lot of these are pretty well known):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THa6ESsSaPs

Rachael98
10-06-11, 04:24 PM
I love that song...
OK, bonus question:

-If Rachael98 beve a noun, what'd it mean?

Rachael98
10-06-11, 04:25 PM
Try again-.-...


I love that song...
OK, bonus question:

-If Rachael98 became a noun, what'd it mean?

missstep13
10-06-11, 05:45 PM
HA portmanteau or portmanteau word is a blend of two (or more) words or morphemes into one new word. A portmanteau word typically combines both sounds and meanings, as in smog, coined by blending smoke and fog. More generally, it may refer to any term or phrase that combines two or more meanings.

The word "portmanteau" was first used in this sense by Lewis Carroll in the book Through the Looking-Glass (1871), in which Humpty Dumpty explains to Alice the coinage of the unusual words in Jabberwocky, where "slithy" means "lithe and slimy" and "mimsy" is "flimsy and miserable". Humpty Dumpty explains the practice of combining words in various ways by telling Alice, 'You see it's like a portmanteau --there are two meanings packed up into one word.'

The word "portmanteau" itself was converted by Carroll to describe the concept. "Portmanteau" comes from French porter, to carry + manteau, cloak (from Old French mantel, from Latin mantellum). In then-contemporary English, a portmanteau was a suitcase.

Hawaiianmomma
10-06-11, 06:20 PM
Try again-.-...


Wu Wei Daoist


Not a disciplined reply to the thread but it what I have always thought of you.....in a good way even when waving rulers about...

Rachael98
10-07-11, 12:06 AM

Wu Wei Daoist


Not a disciplined reply to the thread but it what I have always thought of you.....in a good way even when waving rulers about...

:/ The "-.-" was referring to my own typographical error!

These things are so interesting:).

Rachael98
10-07-11, 12:08 AM

Wu Wei Daoist


Not a disciplined reply to the thread but it what I have always thought of you.....in a good way even when waving rulers about...

Oh, hold on a second; that was what Rachael98 would mean, wasn't it:D?

Hawaiianmomma
10-07-11, 12:11 AM
yes...your jumping the gun like I did yesterday...lol

Hawaiianmomma
10-07-11, 12:12 AM
It is a Very Good Thing Rachael not Bad

bletchingdon
10-20-11, 12:45 PM
I'm the 5th person that doesn't know what it means!!!!!!!

Rachael98
10-20-11, 12:47 PM
Etymology is the study of language:).

TeasTeas
10-23-11, 12:45 AM
love it! est gut esh da ya yea la lol
In other words; yes its is awesome especially when languages paralell to even slight degrees; even when its said they are unrelated. ;) very interesting indeed. Cool stuff!

Rachael98
10-23-11, 01:38 AM
I'm glad that everyone so far cares.
One of my favourite parts are the differences between the many types of English, giving each English-speaking country its own colour (if you'll excuse the absolutely terrible play on words...pun:p)